Telepathy Inspires Mind Sharing Interfaces

In the realm of our physical senses-based world, telepathy has long been regarded as a controversial phenomenon. However, as of late, science and tech journals feature ever more studies, indicating telepathy holds keys to modern technological applications with designs to increase the brain’s channels of communication.

Telepathy is not science fiction. In fact, both science and technology are now drawing inspiration from the principles of telepathy to develop brain interfaces designed to increase the brain’s channels of communication.

Telepathy has long been a disputed phenomenon in the scientific community. On the other hand, it has often been perceived as a viable means of accessing the unconscious mind.

In the late 19th and early 20th Century telepathy was a topic of interest, discussed and written about, by Sigmund Freud, Thomas Huxley, W. T. Stead, and Oscar Wilde, amongst many other eminent men and women of the times. They put into question whether telepathy signaled an evolutionary advance or a possible decline.

In his book, The invention of telepathy 1870-1900, Roger Luckhurst investigates this question and many other questions, in a study that blends the history of science with cultural history and literary analysis surrounding telepathy.

Telepathy and mysticism have been intimately connected in man’s attempt to answer the most taunting questions about life. One could say that telepathy has been seen as a possible bridge to the metaphysical world.

Edgar Cayce, also known as the “Sleeping Prophet” spent over 43 years of his life as a practicing “trance physician” and telepathic clairvoyant. When Cayce passed away, on the 3rd of January 1945, he left an impressive legacy of his life’s work, 140,000 documented stenographic records of his trance readings, one of the most extensive compilations of psychic primary materials recorded to date.

Telepathic connections between twins have provided researchers with the means to study the phenomenon and have served as significant evidence of telepathy amongst humans.

 Dr. Lynn Cherkas, who studied Telepathy in twins, concluded that 20% of identical twins and 1% of fraternal twins had some type of telepathic experience with their twin. A most comprehensive survey on the history of research into twin telepathy is compiled in the book Twin Telepathy by Guy Leon Playfair.

Many people claim to have had some form of telepathic experience at some point in their lives.

Have you ever found yourself jolted out of reverie by your phone ringing and the name that appeared on your screen made your heart leap? Almost gave you the creeps? The very person you were thinking of!

Perhaps a distant friend or family member you’ve been out of touch with for years. Is it a coincidence that they happened to contact you at that particular moment or the exact day you happened to wake up thinking about them or had dreamt of them?

Often time it can be as simple as being in a room with another person and you know exactly what they are about to say, before they say it, at other times it can be a hunch that saves your life or the life of a loved one.

These types of experiences always leave us feeling as though there is some special deeper meaning to the event and give us momentary access to an otherwise invisible and complex network of communications that most of us are unable to willingly harness. They make us reflect deeply on life. The possibility of communicating at a distance by simply using our minds is both alluring and unnerving. It shakes up some fundamental belief systems.

Some people experience precognition, a feeling, or a presentiment of something about to happen or about someone, which reveals itself to be a real occurrence.

I dreamt of my grandfather’s funeral, as a child, and the following day we received news of his death. I had only ever seen my grandfather in photographs since my parents had relocated from Europe to Canada shortly after I was born, so I had no conscious recollection of my grandfather.

I have had several other premonitions over the years, one particularly stands out, involving a girlfriend I’d been quite close to and lost touch with when I moved from the West Coast of Canada back to the East Coast.

For days, following a vivid and preoccupying dream, I attempted to find her. There were few resources available, no internet yet. I managed to get an address for her brother and sent a letter, which eventually made its way to her. Years later, when we met up again, she admitted that upon reading the letter she was startled. How could I possibly have known that she was going through difficult and trying times, in a situation that had put her life at risk? The letter had been a wake-up call for her and as a result, she set herself on a new path and out of harm’s way.

How can an event that is occurring to a person at a specific time and place be simultaneously communicated to another person’s consciousness who is at a distance?

When telepathic communication occurs, place, time and distance have no bearing.

Extrasensory perception during the dream state has been studied for decades. In truth, the first attempt to study telepathic dreams experimentally is reported by G.B. Ermacora (1895) in a publication of the Society for Psychical Research. 

Most Telepathic experiences involve a direct transference of thought from one person to another. So essentially we have a sender and a receiver communicating without putting into play the usual sensory channels of communication, therefore considered a form of extrasensory perception (ESP).

Studies conducted on people experiencing paranormal phenomena have yielded significant results.

“Scientists at the University of Washington and Carnegie Mellon University created a brain-to-brain interface system that allows one or more people, called “Senders,” to influence the decisions of an individual, called a “Receiver”

https://massivesci.com/articles/mind-control-brain-machine-interface/

Understanding the physical mechanisms of telepathy has inspired modern technology with the endless possibilities and applications of brain-to-brain communications. Much can be uncovered by studying the sensing, emitting, and receiving principles at work in telepathic communication.

Not so far-fetched when you consider Elon Musk’s Neuralink app, a new kind of brain interface being developed, which would allow you to control your iOS device, keyboard, and mouse, just by thinking about it. Even the telephone was invented to meet the needs of long-distance communication.

Both the application and the implications are numerous. Consider the endless possibilities of increasing the brain’s channels of communication. These methods could be employed to treat a wide range of neurological disorders, restore sensory or movement functions, and without a doubt change the way we interact with one another.

Aside from the possible medicinal uses, brain-to-brain communication could find interested players across many disciplines, from sports to business, the military, and civilians. If this technology were to be used on the battlefield it would enable soldiers to send and receive commands and warnings, through a form of electronic or synthetic telepathy.

There is more than sufficient evidence pointing to telepathy and its scientific possibilities. Telepathy no longer resides in the realm of superstition. According to Forbes mind sharing is definitely coming. It will revolutionize how people learn, interact and experience new things. 

Consciousness, free will, and the meaning of life have always been at the core of man’s questions about our existence. It stands to reason that our evolutionary progress should eventually take us beyond the limitations of the five physical senses we rely on and science and technology are leading the way.

Some would argue that we are not ready for this leap and that our innate telepathic abilities are meant to be matured and accessed organically, so to speak, without the aid of technology.

These developments would greatly increase both the efficiency and power of select individuals and organizations to monitor, regulate and respond. Just as we use tools to shape our world, the tools we use shape us.

In our quest to make great leaps, with science and technology at the helm, perhaps we should ask ourselves the same question those luminaries from the early 20th century posed themselves, ‘will it lead us to an evolutionary advance or a possible decline‘?

Image by by Tomasz Alen Kopera

Published by Maddalena Di Gregorio

“I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in” Robert L. Stevenson

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